The Olympic Sculpture Park — An Artful Stroll on Seattle’s Waterfront

Sculpture "Seattle Cloud Cover," by Teresita Fernandez, 2006, a pedestrian bridge with photographic material between layers of glass. Photo by Barbara Newhall

“Seattle Cloud Cover,” by Teresita Fernandez, 2006, lines a pedestrian bridge. The artist used photographic material layered between glass. Big disappointment — she photographed the clouds over Miami for this art work, not Seattle’s famous rainmakers. Photo by Barbara Newhall

By Barbara Falconer Newhall

Photographing Seattle’s Olympic Sculpture Park was fun. Even more fun was downloading all my wannabe works of photo art and poring over over them for hours on end.  Especially the photos I took of Teresita Fernandez’s magical, elusive glass wall, “Seattle Cloud Cover.” And Mark di Suvero’s steely “Schubert Sonata.”

Which shot of the di Suvero steel sculpture hovering over the park path was better? The one with the sky in the background, or the one with the waters of Puget Sound? (The sky.)

Which of the photos of Teresita Fernandez’ mysterious “Seattle Cloud Cover” captured the play

"Schubert Sonata," by Mark di Suvero, 1992. Steel painted and unpainted. Photo by Barbara Newhall

“Schubert Sonata,” by Mark di Suvero, 1992. Steel painted and unpainted. The photo with the sky had the best light.  Photo by Barbara Newhall

of light through the layers of glass and photographic materials? (None. Which means I’ll have to post a bunch and hope for the best.)

The Olympic Sculpture Park was greeted with reservations by some locals because it took out a beloved old train barn. But the setting is as artful and some of the sculpture is pretty cool. It’s

"Seattle Cloud Cover," by Teresita Fernandez, 2006, a pedestrian bridge with photographic material between layers of glass.

Pedestrian walk and “Seattle Cloud Cover.” Photos by Barbara Newhall

Detail of photographic material betwen glass of "Seattle Cloud Cover," by Teresita Fernandez, 2006, a pedestrian bridge at Olympic Sculpture Park, Seattle.

Detail of  “Seattle Cloud Cover” with glimpse of the Space Needle.

a nice little stroll up and down and over and back, which brisk walkers can do in minutes and art lovers and picnickers can splurge an afternoon on.

As I write, son Peter is on his way here for a quickie three-day visit. He’ll stay in the guest room where I’ve stored his little kid furniture along with his shiney herd of soccer and chess trophies

"Seattle Cloud Cove," by Teresita Fernandez, 2006, a pedestrian bridge in Seattle's Olympic Sculpture Park. Also shown, old city railroad tracks and the tall white, "Echo" by James Plensa. 46 feet tall. Resin, steel, marble dust. 13,118 pounds. May, 2014.

A pedestrian bridge with Fernandez’ “Seattle Cloud Cover” spans old city railroad tracks. The tall white shape at left is a 2014 addition to the park, “Echo” by James Plensa. It’s 46 feet tall,13,000 pounds, and is made of resin, steel and marble dust. Photo by Barbara Newhall

and his shelves and shelves of books from high school and college. (If I ship those books to Minneapolis for him, will that mean he’s left home for good?)

Whatever happens to the books, I want to have time to spend with Peter this week, so I won’t be writing a long post here. I’ll just go through the photos from the trip Jon and I took to Seattle over the summer, and post a few.

A risky strategy, of course. The photos could turn out to be too much fun. They could eat up the day, and when Peter arrives his little kid bed won’t be made.

More Olympic Sculpture Park photos at “Olympic Sculpture Park Photos — Cool art, Really Cool Park.”  There’s another cool pedestrian bridge in Austin, Texas; see it at “The Ghost of 300 Million Drought-Killed Trees Hovers Over a Lake in Texas.” Another of my favorite places is “Pentwater, Michigan — A Small Town on a Big Lake.”

"Seattle Cloud Cover," by Teresita Fernandez, 2006, a pedestrian bridge with photographic material between layers of glass.  Photo by Barbara Newhall

Photo by Barbara Newhall

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Comments

  1. My Seattle sister-in-law has this to say about the Sculpture Park:

    “I think The Sculpture park is a jewel close to a waterfront that has been a mixed blessing for a long time filled with fast food and souvenir shops with a few exceptions like The Aquarium and the ferry terminals . . .For me the park has become a favorite place to go and to recommend to visitors.”

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  1. […] photos of Teresita Fernandez’s magical glass shelter at “The Olympic Sculpture Park — An Artful Stroll on Seattle’s Waterfront.”  Elsewhere in Seattle –  “Dale Chihuly’s Glass — Fine Art, Kitsch or […]

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