BARBARA’S BOOK

Publishers Weekly, starred review
"Wrestling with God: Stories of Doubt and Faith" book cover with photo of author Barbara Falconer Newhall

"Any seeker of any faith will be blessed to read the words of this fine author and observer."

Click to learn more about "Wrestling with God"

One Broken Ankle, and Two Lives Grind to a Halt. Or, Why You Should Definitely Stop and Tie That Loose Shoelace

A 75-year-old man with his broken ankle in a cast in a hospital bed in his den with TV. Photo by Barbara Newhall

I’m doing my wifey thing. My husband has a broken ankle and I’m taking care of him. That means I’m exhausted. And grumpy. Read more.

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The Bride Said Yes to the Dress . . . The Mother-of-the-Bride Diaries Begin

Seamstress and saleswoman Nordstrom fit a bride with a wedding dress. Yes to the dress. Photo by Barbara Newhall

The woman said yes to The Dress, the one she’ll be wearing on her wedding day. With that, her mother opened a credit card account and placed the order. Read more.

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Wedding Wear: The Aunt Wore Black

red eileen fisher dress with shirt. . looking for a dress for niece's wedding. nordstrom. Eileen Fisher $248 for the shirt and $378 for the dress

This wedding called for a festive evening dress with panache and color and sparkle. And skin. Lots of it. Arms. Legs. And, what the heck, décolletage. Read more.

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A Footwear Meditation–Chic Feet and Stylish Legs on the Go at SFO

Mother and daughter wait for airplane at SFO. The girl wears pink socks, her mother wears camouflage pants. PHoto by Barbara Newhall

A parade of fashionable traveling feet transformed itself into a meditation on the passage of time as I waited for a flight out of SFO last month. Read more.

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For China’s Young Fashionistas the Cultural Revolution Is So Over

Two teenaged Chinese girls gettingt their picture taken in Beijing. One has dyed her hair orange.

Until very recently, when I thought of China, I didn’t think of fun. I thought of the Cultural Revolution of the ’60s and ’70s, when traditional Chinese men were forced to cut off their queues, and intellectuals were banished to the countryside to till the soil and be reeducated into the proletariat.

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