BARBARA’S BOOK

Publishers Weekly, starred review
"Wrestling with God: Stories of Doubt and Faith" book cover with photo of author Barbara Falconer Newhall

"Any seeker of any faith will be blessed to read the words of this fine author and observer."

Click to learn more about "Wrestling with God"

GodsBigBlog: Native American Tori Isner — Want to Find Holy? Go Look at a Rock

Army vet Tori Isner traces her roots to the Eastern Band of Cherokee of North Carolina. She’s an adopted Lakota Sioux who currently lives in Texas. “Go look at the ocean. That’s Creator. That’s beauty.”

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Book Openers: Simone Weil on Prayer — First, Pay Attention

Simone Weil’s Waiting for God is a dense, highly politicized book. But Weil’s startling insights into the nature of God and God’s relationship to humanity are truly worth stuggling through this imposing text.

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The Writing Room: Is Less More? Or Is More More?

What’s wrong with this sentence? “It was a letter from my lover; my heart thumped, my stomach sank, my breath stopped, and my hands shook as I opened it.”

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The Writing Room: Two Must-Have Craft Journals for the Literary Writer

Poets & Writers and The Writer’s Chronicle are the only two magazines that never seem to make it to the stack of unread magazines forever piling up on my kitchen counter. If one of them shows up in our mailbox around lunch time, instead of plopping it onto the pile, I open it up and read. On those days, it can be an hour or more before lunch is over and I find my way back downstairs to my writing room.

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Book Openers: Green for God

A review of two new books that explore the confluence of spiritual and environmental concerns, “Holy Ground: A Gathering of Voices on Caring for Creation” from Sierra Club books, and “The Green Bible: Understand the Bible’s Powerful Message for the Earth” from HarperOne.

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A Mother Who Prevailed at Auschwitz

Stones left on the wall of the Dohany Street Synagogue, Budapest, in memory of Jews lost in the Shoah. Photo by Barbara Newhall

When Ernie Hollander’s family arrived at Auschwitz in 1944, his mother was ordered to the right, his sisters to the left. Read more.

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